Implementation Project – Information Technology Hw

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Implementation Project – Information Technology Hw

The key terms of Information Technology Homework include, System, Information, Implementation, Project, Phase, Requirements, Computer, Software, Code.


User documentation –

highlights how to use the system


Online training –

runs over the Internet or off a CD-ROM


Workshop training –

is held in a classroom environment and lead by an instructor


Parallel implementation

– use both the old and new system simultaneously


Plunge implementation

– discard the old system completely and use the new


Pilot implementation

– start with small groups of people on the new system and gradually add more users


Phased implementation

– implement the new system in phases


ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange)

coding system that personal computers use


Keyboards

most frequently input devices for notebooks and desktops to enter information and commands


Stylus

most frequently used input devices for PDAs and tablet PCs to enter information and commands


Pointing Device –

used to input commands


Touchpad

dark rectangle you use to move the cursor with your finger


Pointing stick

a little rod, used mostly on notebooks


Scanners

used to convert information that exists in visible form into electronic form


Image scanner –

captures images, photos, text, and artwork


Bar code scanner –

reads information in the form of vertical bars


Biometric scanner –

scans a human physical attribute, like a fingerprint or iris, for security purposes


Viewable image size (VIS) –

the size of the image on a monitor


Resolution of a screen –

the number of pixels it has


Pixels (picture elements) –

the dots that make up the image


Dot pitch –

the distance between the centers of two like-colored pixels


Megabyte (MB or M or Meg) –

– about 1 million bytes


Gigabyte (GB or Gig)

about 1 billion bytes


Terabyte (TB)

about 1 trillion bytes


Hard disk –

magnetic storage with one or more thin metal platters sealed inside the drive


Insourcing –

IT specialists inside your organization


Selfsourcing –

do-it-yourself approach many end users take with little or no help from IT specialists


Outsourcing –

a third-party organization (i.e., let someone do the work and pay them for it)


Systems development life cycle (SDLC) –

a structured step-by-step approach for developing information systems


Also called a waterfall

methodology, an approach in which each phase of the SDLC is followed by another, from planning through implementation


Planning phase

– create a solid plan for developing your information system


Project scope –

clearly defines the high-level system requirements


Scope creep –

occurs when the scope of the project increases


Feature creep –

occurs when developers add extra features that were not part of the initial requirements


Project scope document –

a written definition of the project scope and is usually no longer than a paragraph


Project plan –

defines the what, when, and who questions of system development


Project manager

– an individual who is an expert in project planning and management, defines and develops the project plan and tracks the plan to ensure all key project milestones are completed on time


Project milestones

– represent key dates for which you need a certain group of activities performed


Analysis phase –

involves end users and IT specialists working together to gather, understand, and document the business requirements for the proposed system


Business requirements

– the detailed set of knowledge worker requests that the system must meet in order to be successful


Requirements definition document –

prioritizes the business requirements and places them in a formal comprehensive document


Design phase –

build a technical blueprint of how the proposed system will work


Development phase –

take all of your detailed design documents from the design phase and transform them into an actual system


Testing phase

– verifies that the system works and meets all of the business requirements defined in the analysis phase


Test conditions

the detailed steps the system must perform along with the expected results of each step


Unit testing –

tests individual units of code


System testing –

verifies that the units of code function correctly when integrated


Integration testing –

verifies that separate systems work together


User acceptance testing (UAT) –

determines if the system satisfies the business requirements


Implementation phase –

distribute the system to all of the knowledge workers and they begin using the system to perform their everyday jobs


User documentation –

highlights how to use the system


Online training –

runs over the Internet or off a CD-ROM


Workshop training –

is held in a classroom environment and lead by an instructor


Parallel implementation

– use both the old and new system simultaneously


Plunge implementation

– discard the old system completely and use the new


Pilot implementation

– start with small groups of people on the new system and gradually add more users


Phased implementation

– implement the new system in phases


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