Social Policy And Russian Government – History

Social Policy And Russian Government – History

In this history chapter we study about social policy and Russian government.


Allies

the countries of France, Russia, Britain, and, from 1917, the United States during World War I


annexation

to add or attach territory into an existing political unit such as a country, state, county, or city


apartheid

a South African social policy of racial segregation involving political, economic, and legal discrimination against non-whites


artisan

a craftsperson


asocial

unable or unwilling to conform to normal standards of social behavior; antisocial


atonal

lacking a tonal center or key; characterized by atonality


attrition

a wearing-down or weakening of resistance as a result of continuous pressure or harassment


autocratic

form of government where one person has absolute rule


Bolshevik

a member of the left-wing majority group of the Russian Social Democratic Workers’ Party


bourgeoisie

the middle class


chattel

a type of slavery where the slave is the sole property of the master with no rights


collaborator

to cooperate, usually willingly, with an enemy nation, especially with one enemy occupying one’s country


combatant

person that takes part in armed strife


czar

a male monarch or emperor of Russia before 1917. Russian for Caesar, czar is also spelled tsar


Democracy

a form of government where every citizen gets to participate


dissonance

disagreeable sounds; opposite of harmony


euthanasia

practice of ending the life of an individual suffering from an incurable condition, as by lethal injection or withholding medical treatment


exile

a person banished from his or her native land


exterminate

to get rid of by destroying; destroy totally


genocide

the systematic killing of a people group by another


genre

a category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, marked by a distinctive style, form, or content


globalization

the process of conducting business on a global scale


harmony

the sounding of two or more musical notes at the same time in a way that is pleasant or desired


Holocaust

the systematic mass slaughter of European Jews and others in Nazi concentration camps during World War II


liberalism

a political orientation that favors social progress by reform and by changing laws rather than by revolution


literacy

ability to read and write


melody

a rhythmical succession of single tones producing a distinct musical phrase or idea


Menshevik

a member of the liberal minority group of the Russian Social Democratic Party


Nationalism

a strong sense of love and devotion toward a nation


negotiations

mutual discussion and arrangement of the terms of a transaction or agreement


nocturne

an instrumental composition of a pensive, dreamy mood, especially one for the piano


phenomenon

something that is impressive or extraordinary


pragmatism

a way of thinking that is more concerned with results than with theories


prelude

a piece of music played as an introduction to the main piece


productivity

producing or tending to produce goods and services having exchange value


proletariat

the poorest class of working people in society


propaganda

to publicly spread an idea or policy


protectionism

economic policy advocating government protection of domestic agriculture and industries from foreign competition by institution of tariffs, quotas, or other restrictions on foreign imports


rearmament

to rearm oneself again; to equip with better weapons


reparation

compensation demanded by the victor over its vanquished foe


republicanism

the political orientation of those who hold that a republic is the best form of government


revolution

the overthrow of one government and its replacement with another


rhythm

the “beat” of music; the regular pattern of long and short notes. Certain kinds of music, such as blues or marches, have a very characteristic rhythm


serf

a member of the lowest feudal class


serfdom

farmland owned by nobility and run by enslaved workers


socialism

any of various theories or systems of social organization in which the means of producing and distributing goods is owned collectively or by a centralized government that often plans and controls the economy


symphony

a concert performed by a symphony orchestra


syncopation

a shift of accent in a passage or composition that occurs when a normally weak beat is stressed


tariff

a tax on imported goods


urbanization

the process by which cities grow or by which societies become more urban


utilitarianism

theory that emphasizes practical usefulness of things, not their outward beauty


Uitlanders

term comes from the Afrikaans for ‘foreigner’, was the name given to foreign migrant workers


Homepage