Judicial Activism & Government – Political Science

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US Government, Court Cases, Judicial, Activism, Power, Segregation, Board, Bill of Rights

The key terms in this Political Science course include Establish, Government, Judicial, Power, Court, Activism, Segregation, Board, Bill of Rights, Warren Courts Judicial Activism,


Palko v. Connecticut (1937)

Provided test for determining which parts of Bill of Rights should be federalized those which are implicitly or explicitly necessary for liberty to exist.

Korematsu v. U.S. (1944)

Upheld as constitutional the internment of Americans with Japanese descent during WWII.


Brown v. Board, 1st (1954)

School segregation unconstitutional; segregation psychologically damaging to blacks; overturned separate but equal; use of 14th Amendment; judicial activism ofWarren Court; unanimous decision.


Brown v. Board, 2nd (1955)

Ordered schools to desegregate with all due and deliberate speed.


Roth v. United States (1957)

Established that obscenity is not within the area of constitutionally protected speech or press.


Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Established exclusionary rule; illegally obtained evidence cannot be used in court; Warren Courts judicial activism in criminal rights.


Marbury v. Madison (1803)

Established judicial review; midnight judges; John Marshall; power of the Supreme Court.


McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)

Established national supremacy; established implied powers; use of elastic clause; state unable to tax federal institution; John Marshall; the power to tax involves the power to destroy.


Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)

Established a broad interpretation of the Commerce Clause; determined Congress power encompassed virtually every form of commercial activity. The Commerce Clause has been the constitutional basis for much of Congress regulation of the economy.

Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

Established separate by equal. Gave Supreme Court approval to Jim Crow laws.


Schenck v. U.S. (1919)

Oliver Wendell Holmes; clear and present danger test; shouting fire in a crowded theatre; limits on speech, esp. in wartime.


Gitlow v. New York (1925)

Established precedent of federalizing Bill of Rights (applying them to the states); states cannot deny freedom of speech protected through due process clause of Amendment 14.


Near v. Minnesota (1931)

Held that the 1st Amendment protects newspapers from prior restraint.


Palko v. Connecticut (1937)

Provided test for determining which parts of Bill of Rights should be federalized those which are implicitly or explicitly necessary for liberty to exist.

Korematsu v. U.S. (1944)

Upheld as constitutional the internment of Americans with Japanese descent during WWII.


Brown v. Board, 1st (1954)

School segregation unconstitutional; segregation psychologically damaging to blacks; overturned separate but equal; use of 14th Amendment; judicial activism ofWarren Court; unanimous decision.


Brown v. Board, 2nd (1955)

Ordered schools to desegregate with all due and deliberate speed.


Roth v. United States (1957)

Established that obscenity is not within the area of constitutionally protected speech or press.


Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Established exclusionary rule; illegally obtained evidence cannot be used in court; Warren Courts judicial activism in criminal rights.


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