Self-Pollination & Cross-Pollination Of Berry – Fruit Science

Self-Pollination & Cross-Pollination Of Berry – Fruit Science

This quiz covers Self-Pollination & Cross-Pollination Of Berry – Fruit Science.


A. Pears are a type of fruit called __________because it has multiple fused carpels, and a hard inner ovary wall surrounded by accessory fleshy tissue (also called hypanthium).

  • Hesperidium
  • Pome – correct
  • Berry
  • Drupe
  • Pepo

B. Peaches are an example of a ___________because they have a single seed with a pit.

  • Hesperidium
  • Pome
  • Berry
  • Drupe – correct
  • Pepo 

C. Fruits in the Cucurbit family such as pumpkins, gourds, cucumbers are all a type of fruit called ___________.

  • Hesperidium
  • Pome
  • Berry
  • Drupe
  • Pepo – correct

D. Oranges are a type of fruit called ___________because it has a leathery rind and sections/carpels divided by septa.

  • Hesperidium – correct
  • Pome
  • Berry
  • Drupe
  • Pepo 

E. A ____________ is a type of fruit produced by multiple fused carpels but the ovary walls and inner tissues are juicy.

  • Hesperidium
  • Pome
  • Berry – correct
  • Drupe
  • Pepo 

Fruit plants that don’t require genetically distinct pollen for fertilization commonly undergo ___________________________.

  •  Self-pollination – correct
  • Stenospermocarpy
  • Cross-pollination
  • Dioecious
  • Self-incompatibility
  • Monoecious
  • Parthenocarpic

___________________________ is the abortion of a seed with the normal development of a fruit, creating a seedless berry like seedless table grapes.

  • Self-pollination
  • Stenospermocarpy – correct
  • Cross-pollination
  • Dioecious
  • Self-incompatibility
  • Monoecious
  • Parthenocarpic

Some fruit trees can use their own pollen but tend to have better yields when they are fertilized with genetically distinct pollen, also known as __________________________.

  • Self-pollination
  • Stenospermocarpy
  • Cross-pollination – correct
  • Dioecious
  • Self-incompatibility
  • Monoecious
  • Parthenocarpic

___________________________ plants are ones that have separate and distinct male plants and female plants.

  • Self-pollination
  • Stenospermocarpy
  • Cross-pollination
  • Dioecious – correct
  • Self-incompatibility
  • Monoecious
  • Parthenocarpic

When fertilization by genetically similar pollen is prevented, this is termed ___________________________.

  • Self-pollination
  • Stenospermocarpy
  • Cross-pollination
  • Dioecious
  • Self-incompatibility – correct
  • Monoecious
  • Parthenocarpic

___________________________ means separate male and female flowers on a single plant.

  • Self-pollination
  • Stenospermocarpy
  • Cross-pollination
  • Dioecious
  • Self-incompatibility
  • Monoecious – correct
  • Parthenocarpic

Pineapple fruit can set and mature without a seed (no fertilization occurred), which is an example of ___________________________ fruit.

  • Self-pollination
  • Stenospermocarpy
  • Cross-pollination
  • Dioecious
  • Self-incompatibility
  • Monoecious
  • Parthenocarpic – correct

Superior
  • Superior – correct
  • Inferior
  • Perigynous

Self-Pollination & Cross-Pollination Of Berry - Fruit Science . Superior
  • Superior – correct
  • Inferior
  • Perigynous

Inferior
  • Superior
  • Inferior – correct
  • Perigynous

Perigynous
  • Superior
  • Inferior
  • Perigynous – correct

Perigynous
  • Superior
  • Inferior
  • Perigynous – correct

Self-Pollination & Cross-Pollination Of Berry - Fruit Science. Inferior
  • Superior
  • Inferior – correct
  • Perigynous

Vaccinium corymbosum

  • Highbush blueberry – correct
  • Hops (common)
  • Strawberry
  • Red currant
  • American gooseberry
  • Raspberry
  • European gooseberry

Humulus lupulus

  • Highbush blueberry
  • Hops (common) – correct
  • Strawberry
  • Red currant
  • American gooseberry
  • Raspberry
  • European gooseberry

Fragaria × ananassa

  • Highbush blueberry
  • Hops (common)
  • Strawberry – correct
  • Red currant
  • American gooseberry
  • Raspberry
  • European gooseberry

Ribes rubrum

  • Highbush blueberry
  • Hops (common)
  • Strawberry
  • Red currant – correct
  • American gooseberry
  • Raspberry
  • European gooseberry

Ribes hirtellum

  • Highbush blueberry
  • Hops (common)
  • Strawberry
  • Red currant
  • American gooseberry – correct
  • Raspberry
  • European gooseberry

Rubus idaeus

  • Highbush blueberry
  • Hops (common)
  • Strawberry
  • Red currant
  • American gooseberry
  • Raspberry – correct
  • European gooseberry

Ribes grossularia var. uva-crispa

  • Highbush blueberry
  • Hops (common)
  • Strawberry
  • Red currant
  • American gooseberry
  • Raspberry
  • European gooseberry – correct

Drag and drop the reason why (or why not) the fruit crop wouldn’t grow, produce fruit or work for New York climate.

Correct Options

Self-Pollination & Cross-Pollination Of Berry - Fruit Science. Fruit

Short Answer - Free Response Questions

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Q1. What is an ever-bearing strawberry in terms of production and berry size?

Q2. Describe how the “modern” strawberry was created.

Q3. What is chilling requirement in fruit crops?

What happens if winter cold is insufficient for the required chilling hours?

What happens if the chilling requirement is satisfied too soon, and the weather warms up but then there’s a spring freeze?

Q4. Your friend wants to upgrade his home brewing by growing his own hops, but your friend knows nothing about how to grow them. He comes to you for advice.Explain to your friend:

  • The set-up and equipment needed before planting
  • How to pick out the correct plant/cultivar
  • When to harvest, what to harvest and methods of harvesting

Q5. In reference to currant production:

  1. What are the ranges in color of fruit?
  2. Do they have thorns?
  3. Why is the spacing different between red currants (3-4 feet apart) and black currants (8-12 feet apart)?
  4. How are currants pruned and when?

Q6. In reference to gooseberry production:

  1. What is the difference between European and American types?
  2. Do they have thorns?
  3. What kind of site and soil are preferred?
  4. How are they pruned and when?

Q7. What is the White Pine Blister Rust and why is it a big deal with currants and gooseberries? What impact did the WPBR have on commercial production of currants and gooseberries?

Q8. In reference to blueberry production:

  1. What species of blueberry is grown for commercial production or You-Pick farms?
  2. What species of blueberry is grown in Maine and Vermont as managed wild stands?
  3. What site requirements are needed for blueberries?
  4. What can be done to protect blueberry plants from a late spring frost?

Dear student if you need help with answers/explanations to the questions below, kindly contact us and our tutors will help you explain and solve your questions in 15 minutes. You could message us on Facebook or click here to send us a request. Thank you for visiting us!

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